The uncanny resemblance between Hill$ong’s ‘The Monkey’, the Star Wars Cantina Theme and the Goodies’ ‘Funky Gibbon’

 

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “The uncanny resemblance between Hill$ong’s ‘The Monkey’, the Star Wars Cantina Theme and the Goodies’ ‘Funky Gibbon’

  1. Greg, my point was that Hillsong’s account of what happened disagreed with the police/ambulance and also with the owners of the camp site. The camp site owners disagreed also with the other two.

    So who are we to believe?

    Like

  2. So what are you saying Old Dude – who do you believe and why?

    Events always come into conflict with councils – especially religious events – its a private property, what they choose to do is not up to council really

    Like

  3. So who is telling porkies? I’ve often wondered when reading stories like this, although experience suggests ……

    Police/Ambulance
    A police spokesman said one girl suffered suspected spinal injuries after ‘‘falling’’ from a pile of gym mats while 15 others were treated for a range of issues including heat exhaustion, an asthma attack and neck injuries.

    An Ambulance Service of NSW spokeswoman said four people were taken to hospital, including two in the helicopter, with head and back injuries after being trampled on.

    One girl remained in John Hunter Children’s Hospital in a stable condition.

    AS opposed to Hillsong/Camp owners

    However, a Hillsong spokeswoman last night claimed all the patients had suffered heat exhaustion and just needed treatment at the camp.

    Tahlee Ministries director Reverend John Anderson also denied kids has been injured during mosh pits.

    ‘‘There were no major issues, it was a hot day and the kids were out in the sun and came back in the tent in the evening, some suffered heat stroke and as a precautionary measure they were transported to hospital,’’ he said.

    Like

  4. Teens hurt at Hillsong concert

    SIX ambulances and a rescue helicopter were needed to treat at least 16 people at a religious camp and concert held on a remote property near Karuah.

    Police said 1300 teenagers aged between 15 and 18 had spent four days at the Tahlee property as part of the ‘‘wildlife summer camp’’ being run by Hillsong Australia.

    But emergency services were ‘‘stretched to breaking point’’ when paramedics, police and the Hunter Westpac rescue helicopter sped to the property on Thursday night following reports that people had been crushed in a ‘‘mosh pit’’ incident.

    A police spokesman said one girl suffered suspected spinal injuries after ‘‘falling’’ from a pile of gym mats while 15 others were treated for a range of issues including heat exhaustion, an asthma attack and neck injuries.

    An Ambulance Service of NSW spokeswoman said four people were taken to hospital, including two in the helicopter, with head and back injuries after being trampled on.

    One girl remained in John Hunter Children’s Hospital in a stable condition.

    However, a Hillsong spokeswoman last night claimed all the patients had suffered heat exhaustion and just needed treatment at the camp.

    The spokeswoman rejected claims that anyone was injured in the ‘‘mosh pit’’ at a concert being held.

    The camp is an annual four-day festival for teens aged between 15 and 18.

    The venue owner is Tahlee Ministries, a Christian organisation that has been holding Bible camps at the site since the 1940s.

    Tahlee Ministries director Reverend John Anderson also denied kids has been injured during mosh pits.

    ‘‘There were no major issues, it was a hot day and the kids were out in the sun and came back in the tent in the evening, some suffered heat stroke and as a precautionary measure they were transported to hospital,’’ he said.

    ‘‘There were activities in the big tent and with large numbers of young people there were a few collisions but it wasn’t major.’’

    But the venue itself may be in legal trouble after it allowed the festival to go ahead without approval from Great Lakes Council, ignoring a request to obtain council approval for the event.

    The council’s investigations and prosecutions officer Greg Pevitt said Tahlee Ministries had been told it would need development consent for the event after complaints from neighbouring residents when it was held last year.

    Reverend Anderson said the group ignored the request because it believed its initial consent dating back some decades applied.

    ‘‘We’re still negotiating with the council about the need for a DA, and I suppose we’ve had a difference of opinion to this point,’’ he said.

    It’s that difference of opinion that may land both parties in court if a solution is not found.

    ‘‘If we can’t resolve it amicably, which I hope we can, it might result in it ending up in the Land and Environment Court for arbitration,’’ Mr Pevitt said.

    He said the council had not been informed of injuries at the festival.

    ‘‘We contacted the venue and strongly advised against running the event without a development application and their response was that it was too late and the event had already been planned,’’ he said.

    http://www.theherald.com.au/story/2030524/teens-hurt-at-hillsong-concert/?cs=303

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s